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Intermediate Instant Lesson™
Criss-Crossed Lovers

Pre-Reading Activities

A: Quiz

An impulsive person acts suddenly without thinking carefully about what might happen as a result of their action.

Are you an impulsive person?  Take the English-To-Go Impulse Quiz and find out.  (Circle the answer that describes you.)

Scenario 1:  You are shopping with your friends when you suddenly see a very expensive jacket that you REALLY like.  You...
    A.  buy it immediately.
    B.  hide it somewhere in the shop where no one else can find it and buy it later after checking that you have enough money in the bank.
    C.  decide to buy it after you have saved enough money for it.

Scenario 2:  You have been invited to a friend's house for a meal. As you are walking towards your friend's house, you catch the smell of some fresh baked cookies coming from the open door of a shop. They smell delicious.  You...
    A. buy a bag of cookies and eat them.
    B. buy a bag and eat some cookies but worry that if you eat too many, you won't want to eat the meal your friend has prepared.   
    C.  do not buy any cookies because you know if you do, you will eat some and then you won't want to eat the meal your friend has prepared.

Scenario 3:  You walk past a very old house that no one has lived in for years.  You notice that the front door is opened just a little bit.  You...
    A.  walk into the house and have a look.
    B.  go get your friends and return to the house.
    C.  run away as fast as you can.

Scenario 4:  You are having a holiday.  A friend phones you and tells you he / she has a free airplane ticket to Europe.  The flight leaves in five days.  He asks you if you want to come.  You...
    A.  start packing your bags immediately.
    B.  call your family and ask them what they think.
    C.  decline to go because you don't have enough time to get ready.

Scenario 5:  You REALLY like someone.  You...
    A.  tell him / her your feelings the next time you see them.
    B.  write a beautiful poem and send it to that person.
    C.  say nothing because you are afraid he / she won't like you.

Scenario 6:  You want to surprise your sweetheart with a ring.  You...
    A.  buy the first ring you like and worry about the size and cost later.
    B.  tell your sweetheart about your plan but suggest he / she come with you to pick it out.
    C.  visit over 20 jewelry stores and decide none of the rings you saw are good enough for your sweetheart. You decide to wait until the stores have some new stock.

So, are you impulsive? Read the results guide to find out!

If you mostly have As: Yes, you are very impulsive. Your friends enjoy your enthusiasm. They are never bored when they are with you because you are always doing things without thinking about what the results might be. Your life is interesting but it might be a good idea to train yourself to think a little before you rush into the next situation. That way you won't get hurt.

If you mostly have Bs: You're just right! You think of something interesting to do but then take a little time to think over whether or not it is a good idea. Then, if you have decided it is, you do the activity. Your friends don't worry about you because they know you have the right mix of common sense and impulsiveness.

If you mostly have Cs: No-one could call you impulsive! You spend so much time being careful, that it is hard to see how you ever have any fun! You are very careful but that means that you miss out on some great experiences like surprising your sweetheart with a gift or going traveling overseas. It is good to think carefully before you do something, but try sometimes to be a little impulsive. You may even enjoy the experience!

B:  Pair Work
What are some good points and bad points about being impulsive?  With a partner make a list and then share your answers with another pair of students.

Good Points:...

Bad Points:...

Reading Activities

A: Sequencing
Read today's article and then put the events in the correct order.  The first event is 1, the second event 2, the last event 12.  Note:  Some of the events happened at the same time!

_____ Johnstone proposed to Dolby over the phone.
_____ He started working at a Sydney building site.
_____ Dolby returned to Britain.
_____ Ian Johnstone flew to Australia.
_____ Johnstone flew to Britain to propose to his girlfriend, Amy Dolby.
_____ She waited for her connecting flight in the airport lounge in Singapore.
_____ Amy Dolby flew from London to see Ian Johnstone.
_____ He waited for his connecting flight in the airport lounge in Singapore.
_____ Johnstone went to Amy's apartment in Britain but she wasn't there.
_____ Dolby called Johnstone from Australia.
_____ Dolby was greeted at Ian's flat (apartment) by Ian's flat mate.
_____ Johnstone returned to Australia.
 

Lovers Criss-Cross World in Vain

LONDON Thursday July 26 (Reuters) - Ian Johnstone missed his girlfriend so much he flew back to Britain from Australia to propose to her. The problem is she did the same in the opposite direction.

He and Amy Dolby even managed to miss each other when they sat in the same airport lounge in Singapore at the same time to wait for connecting flights.

Dolby, heartbroken when she arrived at Johnstone's Sydney apartment to find he had flown to London, told the Times: ``It was as though someone was playing a cruel joke on us.

``He is the most romantic person I have ever known. I think our problem is that we are both quite impulsive people. We are always trying to surprise each other.''

After an 11,000-mile flight across the globe, she was greeted by Johnstone's astonished flat mate asking what she was doing there.

``The awful truth dawned when I found that Ian's rucksack and most of his clothes were missing. I sat on the end of his bed and cried my eyes out,'' she said.

Johnstone, a 27-year-old bricklayer, had taken a year off to travel round Australia. But he was missing Dolby, a 26-year-old secretary, so much he got a job on a Sydney building site and started saving for a surprise.

He then flew home to Britain and went to her apartment armed with an engagement ring, champagne and flowers.

``I really missed Amy and I'd been thinking about her all the time. I thought she was winding me up when she phoned me from Australia,'' he said.

Johnstone then asked Dolby to marry him on the phone. ``I didn't know whether to laugh or cry but I accepted,'' she said.

Dolby was given a tour of Sydney by Johnstone's friends before wending her weary way home. Johnstone had to stay in Britain for two weeks because he could not change his ticket.

Article © Reuters Limited. Lesson © 2006 www.english-to-go.com

 

B: True / False / Not Given
Read the following statements and compare them with the information in the article.  Write 'T' if the statement is true, 'F' if the statement is false, and 'NM" if the article does not have that information.

1.  Johnstone and Dolby are from Britain.
2.  Johnstone and Dolby met in Britain.
3.  Johnstone decided to take a year off from work to travel around Australia.
4.  Johnstone got a job in Sydney so he could start saving money for a surprise airplane flight to Britain.
5.  Dolby is older than Johnstone.
6.  It took Dolby 24 hours to get to Sydney from London.
7.  Johnstone was met at Dolby's apartment door by her roommate.
8.  Johnstone stayed longer in Britain than Dolby stayed in Sydney.
 

C: Guessing By Context
A form of the word 'miss' is used in today's article five times.  Look at the following excerpts from the article and choose the best answer for each usage of 'miss'.  Do not use your dictionary.

1.  Paragraph 1 (P1)  Ian Johnstone missed his girlfriend so much he flew back to Britain from Australia to propose to her.  'Missed' means...
    a.  do not notice something or someone       b.  something is not in its usual place        c.  feel sad because the person is not with you

2.  P2  He and Amy Dolby even managed to miss each other in the airport lounge in Singapore.  'Miss' means...
    a.  do not notice something or someone       b.  something is not in its usual place       c.  feel sad because the person is not with you

3.  P6  Ian's rucksack and most of his clothes were missing.  'Missing' means...
    a.  do not notice something or someone       b.  something is not in its usual place       c.  feel sad because the person is not with you

4.  P7  But he was missing Dolby so much he got a job on a Sydney building site and started saving for a surprise.  'Missing' means...
    a.  do not notice something or someone       b.  something is not in its usual place       c.  feel sad because the person is not with you

5.  P9  "I really missed Amy and I'd been thinking about her all the time."  'Missed' means...
    a.  do not notice something or someone       b.  something is not in its usual place       c.  feel sad because the person is not with you
 

D: Thinking Carefully
Read these sentences and answer the questions that follow.  They encourage you to think more carefully about sentences from the article.

1.  Johnstone then asked Dolby to marry him on the phone. ``I didn't know whether to laugh or cry but I accepted,'' she said. Why do you think Dolby said she didn't know whether to laugh or cry?

2.  "I thought she was winding me up when she phoned me from Australia," he said.  What do you think 'winding me up' means?
 

E: Language
Look at the following sentence from today's article:

But he was missing Dolby, a 26-year-old secretary, so much he got a job on a Sydney building site and started saving for a surprise.

Non-defining clauses are clauses that add more information to a sentence.  In this sentence the non-defining clause is: a 26-year-old secretary.  If the non-defining clause is removed from the sentence, the sentence is still complete:  But he was missing Dolby so much he got a job on a Sydney building site and started saving for a surprise.

Non-defining clauses refer to the preceding person or thing.  In today's example, 'a 26-year-old secretary' refers to Dolby.

Fill in the missing non-defining clauses in the following sentences with your own ideas.  The first one is done for you as an example.

1.  My hometown of Seattle, USA, famous for Starbucks coffee and grunge music, is a great place to live.

2.  My hometown of _____________ , _____________, is a great place to live.

3.  The Olympics, __________________________, will be held in Greece in 2004.

4.  Dolphins, __________________________, are very intelligent.

5.  AIDS, __________________________, has killed millions of people in the last 20 years.

6.  My teacher, __________________________, is very skilled at his / her job.

7.  Mobile phones, __________________________, continue to get smaller and smaller in size.

 



Post-Reading Activities
You may do one or more of these.

A: Brainstorming
The headline of today's article is "Lovers Criss-Cross World in Vain".  Criss-Cross means to cross over each other.  In today's text Johnstone and Dolby's airplanes crossed over each other as they flew in opposite directions.  However, criss-cross patterns can be much smaller, for example, your shoe laces criss-cross one another to form an 'X' pattern.

In a group of three or four students, write down as many things as you can think of that criss-cross.  Your teacher will time you.  The team with the most things on their list is the winner.
 

B: Speaking
Have you ever had a 'criss-cross' experience in which you were going to see someone and they were coming to see you at the same time?  If you have, share it with the class. 

Have you ever been thinking about someone and suddenly the telephone rings and it is that person?  Or you've been thinking about someone and then you get a letter in the mail from that person?  Share your experience with your classmates.
 

C: Language Focus
In today's article, Ian Johnstone said, "I really missed Amy and I'd been thinking about her all the time."  Now look at this example:  She would never think of leaving him.

'Think about' is used when a person occupies their mind with something or somebody.  It also means to consider something or somebody.

I can't stop thinking about her.
I'm always thinking about how I missed him in Sydney.  I'll never do that again.
He needs to think about how he's going to make money.

'Think of' is used to imagine something.  You can actually replace the word 'think of' with 'imagine'.

Think of yourself with your girlfriend in London right now.  = Imagine yourself with your girlfriend in London right now.
They couldn't think of a way to see each other again.  =  They couldn't imagine a way to see each other again.

Look at the following dialogue about Ian and Amy.  Fill in the gaps with either think about OR think of.  Put the words in the correct form (e.g. infinitive, past, past participle, present participle form, etc.).  When you have finished, compare answers with a partner.  Practice the dialogue together.  You will present your dialogue to your classmates.  Have fun.

Amy is at Ian's apartment in Sydney.  Ian is at Amy's apartment in Britain.  Amy phones her apartment in Britain.

(ring, ring...ring, ring...ring, ring...)
Ian:  Hello?
Amy:  Ian, is that YOU?
Ian:  Yeah, it's me!  Where are YOU?
Amy:  I'm afraid I'm at your flat in Sydney.
Ian:  Are you winding me up?
Amy:  No, I'm really here.  I'm so sorry.
Ian:  No, I'M sorry.  It's just I was 1.)_____________________ you every minute of every day and I decided I wanted to fly back to see you.
Amy:  How did you get the money to fly to Britain?
Ian:  Well, I had to 2.)____________________ a way to make lots of money fast,  I applied for a job at a building site here in Sydney.  What are you doing in Sydney?
Amy:  I came here to see you, of course.  I'd been trying to 3.)____________________ a way to get to Australia for a long time.  I decided to save 30% of every paycheck for the big trip to Sydney.   Now I'm here and you're...there!
Ian:  Yeah, it's strange, isn't it?  But you know what, I'm just glad I get to hear your voice.
Amy:  Yes, me too.  I always 4.)_______________ you.  In the morning, afternoon, evening, and before I go to sleep.
Ian:  Amy, can I ask you a question?  What would you 5.)____________________ us getting married?
Amy:  Is that a proposal, Ian?!  If you're going to propose to me, I want you to do it properly.
Ian:  OK....Will you marry me, Amy?
Amy:  I'll have to 6.)____________________ it for a while.  Just joking!  Of course I'll marry you!  I'm so happy.
Ian:  What do you 7.)____________________ honeymooning in Singapore?  I only saw the airport but Singapore looked beautiful from the sky.
Amy: When were you at the Singapore Airport?
Ian:  This morning between 8 and 10 AM.
Amy:  Me, too!!!
Ian and Amy:  No-oooooooooooooo!!!!!
 


TEACHERS' NOTES AND ANSWER KEY

Please Note: There is also an online listening instantworkbook exercise that is linked to this lesson. Students can listen to Amy's story and work with phrasal verbs.

Pre-Reading Activities

 A: Quiz - Notes
You may wish to go through the scenarios together so that students can ask questions if they do not understand.  You can tell the students that if they answered 'A' to most of the situations, it is likely that they are quite impulsive.

B: Pair Work - Suggested Answers
Good Points:  Usually people who are impulsive are fun and exciting.  An impulsive person is more likely to do something another person might not do.  Therefore, impulsive people often do things that other people won't do. 
Bad Points:  An impulsive person might do or say something they will regret for the rest of their lives.  For example, they might hit someone or laugh at someone.  In today's article both the man and the woman bought something (airline tickets) impulsively and as a result, missed each other.  They don't think before they act so they don't consider the consequences of what they are doing. An impulsive person may spend money unwisely on something they can't afford.

Reading Activities

A: Sequencing - Notes
For events that happened at the same time, tell students to give those events the same number.  (See answers below.)  You may want to circulate to see that students understand the instructions.

A: Sequencing - Answers
1  Ian Johnstone flew to Australia.
2  He started working at a Sydney building site.
3= Johnstone flew to Britain to propose to his girlfriend, Amy Dolby.
3=  Amy Dolby flew from London to see Ian Johnstone.
5=  She waited for her connecting flight in the airport lounge in Singapore.
5=  He waited for his connecting flight in the airport lounge in Singapore.
7=  Dolby was greeted at Ian's flat (apartment) by Ian's flat mate.
7=  Johnstone went to Amy's apartment in Britain but she wasn't there.
9  Dolby called Johnstone from Australia.
10  Johnstone proposed to Dolby over the phone.
11  Dolby returned to Britain.
12  Johnstone returned to Australia.

B: True / False / Not Given - Answers
1. T      2.  NG       3.  T       4.  T        5.  F        6.  NG       7.  F       8.  T

C: Guessing By Context -  Answers
1.  c        2.  a        3.  b        4.  c        5.  c

D: Thinking Carefully - Suggested Answers
1.  She said she didn't know whether to laugh or cry because she was very happy he proposed to her (laugh), but she probably would have preferred he proposed to her in person (cry). She was happy and sad at the same time.
2.  To wind somebody up means to deliberately say something to annoy somebody.

E: Language - Notes
Answers will vary.  Circulate to see that students understand what they are supposed to do.  The non-defining clauses can begin with a relative pronoun or no pronoun at all.  In all cases, the non-defining clauses should be in the present simple tense because they are added facts (e.g.  The Olympics, held every four years in a different country, will be held in Greece in 2004.)

Post-Reading Activities

A: Brainstorming - Notes
Tell the students they have five minutes to think of things.  The sense of urgency will add more excitement to the competition.  When they have finished, ask each group how many things are on their list.  The group with the most things gets to read their list out loud.  Keep track of answers that are correct and not correct.  Ask the team with the second most things on their list to read theirs and follow this same procedure until all of the groups have read their lists.  The team with the most correct things is the winner.
Some things that criss-cross:  shoe laces, straw in a woven basket, a Christian cross, the letters 'x' and 't', strings in a tennis racket, the bars of a jail cell, a bowl of noodles

B: Speaking - Notes
You may want students to share in groups rather than with the whole class depending on the size of your class.

C: Language Focus - Notes
The purpose of this activity is twofold: to give students the opportunity to practice the uses of think about and think of. And to give students practice reading from a dialogue.  The students could have a lot of fun with this by being overly dramatic.  Be sure they stress the words that are in caps (e.g .  Ian, is that YOU?)  You may want to model the dialogue with a student after they have all filled in the gaps to show intonation and stress.
If you would like some more help or ideas on this language point, Anna Grammar answered a letter from Switzerland about this. It is called Confusables - "Think of" and "Think about" and is in the Anna Grammar section of the site. This may help.

C: Language Focus - Answers
1.  thinking about        2.  think of        3.  think of        4.  think about        5.  think of        6.  think about        7.  think about

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