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Featured Story

How Do We Help?
In tough economic times, teachers have to think carefully before spending some of their hard earned money on a subscription or buying an institutional membership for their school. As this is our first newsletter for 2010, it's a good time to answer the question, "How can English-to-go help you this month?"

The site this month has new resources covering the role of journalists when covering a disaster relief effort such as the Haiti earthquake, being prepared for a natural disaster and an intro to Vancouver, host of the Winter Olympics.

We also have fascinating Thomson Reuters articles in our lessons on what makes for bad train travel behavior in Japan and the lowdown on Generation XD--today's 8-14 year-olds - they're apparently a bunch of web-savvy parent-loving environmentalists, according to them! And our free lesson looks at what's going on with cloning in agriculture: you may even be eating produce from cloned animals without being aware of it!

English-to-go prides itself on bringing you fresh, topical resources that are easy to use and have a high level of accuracy. In honor of this last point, our competition this month is a "Spot the mistake" contest. If you find a typo in one of our 2009 or 2010 lessons, and email us with the details (name of lesson, page number and details of typo), we will enter your name in a draw to win a one month's free gold membership (for non-members) to English-to-go.com or a refund of your membership for one month (for ETG members).

Email your competition entry to editor@english-to-go.com .

Best wishes,
The English To Go Team

Newest Resources
Click here to access the newest resources
Newest resources in the Teachers’ Room include:

- Spider Eyes, Elementary Instant Lesson
When cleaning the cage of your pet tarantula spider, wear glasses. A man in England found this out the hard way. Spiders, dangerous animals, pets, sequencing, reference words.

- Generation XD, Pre-Intermediate Instant Lesson

A new survey of eight to 14-year-old Europeans showed that the children of Generation X are web-savvy, videogame-playing environmentalists who love their parents. Children, market research, values, interpreting figures.

- Earthquakes, Intermediate Instant Lesson
An average 10,000 deaths occur worldwide from earthquakes annually. About 18 major earthquakes and one great quake hit in a typical year. Earthquakes, natural disasters, prefixes and word families.

- Happy Travels, Upper Intermediate Instant Lesson
Taking the train in Japan and want to avoid annoying fellow passengers? Keep conversation to a whisper, turn down your iPod and put your phone on vibration mode, a recent survey showed. For Japanese commuters, noise is the biggest issue. Travel, manners, apologizing, direct and reported speech, article revision.

-Do Journalists Help?, Advanced Instant Lesson
The woman carrying the wounded, feverish child caught me off guard during some interviews with survivors in a refugee camp. Veteran journalists from all round the world came to cover the disaster, and it was interesting to see how they handled the often unspoken question of how to help: whether to photograph or carry the wounded baby first. Natural disasters and the role of the media.

- Find Your Other Half - Vancouver
This warmer helps gives practice in listening for specific information, speaking clearly and then listening and writing down exactly what someone says. It has information about Vancouver, host city of the 2010 Winter Olympics.

-Tallest Building - Instant Workbook - Elementary
Find out about famous buildings, the world's newst tallest building, new buildings and old buildings! There are 5 exercises to do. (Grammar - adjectives, comparatives and superlatives, Listening, Reading Comprehension.)


For access to these and more than 1,700 other resources

Win, Win Win!
"Spot the mistake"
contest. If you find a typo in one of our 2009 or 2010 lessons, and email us with the details (name of lesson, page number and details of typo), we will enter your name in a draw to win a one month's free gold membership!


You and English-to-go! Any questions? Email Editor@english-to-go.com
  
Our resources are used by more than 55,000 teachers in 190 countries reaching over one million students worldwide.
Fun, engaging, up-to-date resources based on Thomson Reuters® news articles.

 


Featured lessons
Click here to access resources on the Winter Olympics held in Vancouver, Canada from February 12 to February 28 2010.

Featured Resources include:

- Find Your Other Half - Vancouver
This warmer is a whole class exercise with information about Vancouver, host city of the 2010 Winter Olympics.

- Olympic Mini-Lesson: Olympic Discussions
Get a discussion on the Olympics going with this Intermediate and Above Olympic Mini-Lesson!

 
Free lesson
Click here to access this month's free lesson

- Welcome To The Clone Farm - Advanced Instant Lesson
To the untrained eye, Pollard Farms looks much like any other cattle ranch. Similar looking cows are huddled in similar looking pens. But some of the cattle here don't just resemble each other. They are literally identical. Cloning, advantages and disadvantages, degrees of certainty, second conditional.

This month's Point of Interest
This month's Teaching Point comes from the Advanced level Instant Lesson, "Do Journalists Help?"

'"Can you help?". "Oh ... maybe the American soldiers or the Red Cross up there can." "No, can YOU help? I need YOU to help my baby."

The Haitian woman carrying the wounded, feverish child caught me off guard during some interviews with earthquake survivors in a refugee camp.
Looking me in the eye, with dignified insistence, she posed the question that has wormed away uncomfortably at foreign correspondents for generations: can we help?
Sometimes, as in Haiti during the dark days since the January 12 disaster, the chronicler cannot avoid being participant, however much he or she wants the notebook or camera to be a shield.
This baby's face was so covered with cuts, pus and sores that it was hard to look. Around him, in the same camp, were 50,000 other refugees.
Beyond them in myriad other camps were hundreds of thousands more: homeless, hungry and hurt by the earthquake. Not, though, to be treated as objects of pity: many were carrying out acts of heroism the likes of which we weedy hacks would never be capable.
So did we help -- the hordes of us who leapt on flights and into the backs of trucks to report the disaster that put Haiti so horribly back on the world map?' (Continued..../)

Thomson Reuters 2010

User Comments
I h have very much appreciated this resource during the time of my membership; it is a great teaching tool and always up-to-date! .
Heidi, England

Thanks a million for all the fantastic material I was able to utilize. English-to-go has saved me a lot of headaches and anxieties.
Lilio

This site has been very useful for the past year.
Wendy, New Zealand


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