All Level Instant Lesson™

Casualties on the increase

Pre-Reading Activities

A: How Much Do You Know?

1. Which of these pictures shows a landmine? 2. What does a landmine do?
a. b.  

B: Choose The Best Answer
Choose the best answer for each sentence. (Use your own knowledge to do this.) Then compare answers in pairs.

1. Landmines usually kill a. soldiers b. civilians (the word 'civilians' means people who are not soldiers).

2. Landmines often kill or hurt children. a. Yes b. No.

3. In 2005 landmines killed or hurt a. more than 2,000 people b. more than 7,000 people.

4. We know/don't know how many people landmines kill each year.

5. More than 40/70 countries have landmines.

Reading Activities

A: Reading For Specific Information
Read the article found on page 2 of this lesson. Check your answers for Pre-Reading Activity B.

1. Landmines usually kill a. soldiers b. civilians (this means people who are not soldiers).
2. Landmines often kill or hurt children. a. Yes b. No.
3. In 2005 landmines killed or hurt a. more than 2,000 people b. more than 7,000 people.
4. We a. know b. don't know how many people landmines kill each year. Why?
5. More than a. 40 b. 70 countries have landmines.


B: Thinking Carefully
Answer the question: What can landmines do to families? Use the quote below from today's article and your own ideas.

"Families affected by landmines...want to walk, play and live without fear," Sylive Brigot, executive director of International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), said.


C: Check Your Understanding
Complete these sentences using information from today's article.

1. Landmines kill many people who are not ______. 20% of the people killed by landmines are ______.
2. We know that ______ people were killed or hurt by landmines in 2005. This is an increase of 11%. The real number of deaths may be much higher. This is because many deaths are ______.
3. ______ countries have landmines. An area the size of ______ City was cleared of landmines in 2005.
4. Landmines have hurt ______ people and most of the victims will need help for the rest of their lives.


Elementary - Pre-Intermediate
By Richard Waddington

GENEVA, Wednesday September 13, 2006 (Reuters) Landmines killed or injured 7,328 people in 2005 - almost all of the victims were not soldiers. "Families affected by landmines...want to walk, play and live without fear," Sylive Brigot, executive director of ICBL, said.

20% of landmine victims are children. There are landmines in 78 or more countries.

In 2005 a record area (740 kilometer - the size of New York City) was cleared of landmines but the number of people killed or injured by landmines increased by 11% from 2004.

There are also around 500,000 landmine victims who will need help for the rest of their lives.

Article © 2006 Reuters Limited. Lesson © 2006 www.english-to-go.com

Words: victim - someone who is hurt or killed by someone or something, affect - make something different,
fear
- feeling you have when you think something bad might happen, clear (v) - take things away from a place

 

Intermediate
Landmine casualties up despite record clearing
By Richard Waddington

GENEVA, Wednesday September 13, 2006 (Reuters) A record area was cleared of landmines worldwide last year, but casualties caused by the weapons rose by 11 percent to 7,328, with almost all the victims civilians, many of them children, a report said on Wednesday.

Despite increased clearance work, efforts to implement a 1997 international treaty banning the use of the antipersonnel weapons could slow without higher levels of funding, according to the Land mine Monitor Report 2006. "Families affected by landmines want to see words become reality: they want to walk, play and live without fear, once and for all," said Sylvie Brigot, executive director of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), one of the humanitarian groups which produces the annual report.

Children account for 20 percent of the victims reported in nearly 60 countries. But at least as many other casualties are estimated to go unrecorded.
"We continue to believe the true number is at least two times this (the reported figure)," said Steve Goose of the U.S.-based Human Rights Watch.

The report, which monitors progress in applying the anti-mine treaty adopted by over 150 countries, said landmines remained in at least 78 countries.

INNOCENT CIVILIANS
"The longer states take to clear these mines, the longer these mines wait in the ground for innocent civilians to step on," said Jody Williams, ICBL ambassador and 1997 Nobel Peace Prize co-laureate for her work in setting up the movement.

The total area cleared in 2005 was 740 square kilometers (300 square miles), approximately the size of New York City. Some 470,000 landmines, including about 450,000 antipersonnel mines, and 3.75 million explosive devices were removed.
But funds for de-mining and for assisting victims fell for the first time since the treaty came into force to $376 million, $23 million less than in the previous year, the report said.

The European Union, the United States and eight other major donors cut back on help for de-mining activities. The steepest reductions were seen in Iraq, down 53 percent at $30.9 million, followed by Afghanistan and Cambodia.

Money was also required for the up to 500,000 surviving mine victims, many of whom are maimed and will need help for the rest of their lives, the report said.

Article © 2006 Reuters Limited. Lesson © 2006 www.english-to-go.com

Glossary: casualty - someone who is killed or injured by something, civilian - anyone who is not a soldier or in the police
humanitarian - something trying to improve the lives of people and stop them from suffering or having very hard lives
unrecorded - something that is not written down or remembered, surviving - continuing to live




Upper Intermediate - Advanced
Landmine casualties up despite record clearing
By Richard Waddington

GENEVA, Wednesday September 13, 2006 (Reuters) A record area was cleared of landmines worldwide last year, but casualties caused by the weapons rose by 11 percent to 7,328, with almost all the victims civilians, many of them children, a report said on Wednesday.

Despite increased clearance work, efforts to implement a 1997 international treaty banning the use of the antipersonnel weapons could slow without higher levels of funding, according to the Land mine Monitor Report 2006. "Families affected by landmines want to see words become reality: they want to walk, play and live without fear, once and for all," said Sylvie Brigot, executive director of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), one of the humanitarian groups which produces the annual report.

Children account for 20 percent of the victims reported in nearly 60 countries. But at least as many other casualties are estimated to go unrecorded. "We continue to believe the true number is at least two times this (the reported figure)," said Steve Goose of the U.S.-based Human Rights Watch.

The report, which monitors progress in applying the anti-mine treaty adopted by over 150 countries, said landmines remained in at least 78 countries.

INNOCENT CIVILIANS
"The longer states take to clear these mines, the longer these mines wait in the ground for innocent civilians to step on," said Jody Williams, ICBL ambassador and 1997 Nobel Peace Prize co-laureate for her work in setting up the movement.

The total area cleared in 2005 was 740 square kilometers (300 square miles), approximately the size of New York City. Some 470,000 landmines, including about 450,000 antipersonnel mines, and 3.75 million explosive devices were removed.
But funds for de-mining and for assisting victims fell for the first time since the treaty came into force to $376 million, $23 million less than in the previous year, the report said.

The European Union, the United States and eight other major donors cut back on help for de-mining activities. The steepest reductions were seen in Iraq, down 53 percent at $30.9 million, followed by Afghanistan and Cambodia.

Money was also required for the up to 500,000 surviving mine victims, many of whom are maimed and will need help for the rest of their lives, the report said.

Activists said they expected the issue of money to be raised at the week-long 8th annual conference of signatory states starting in Geneva on September 18.
Under the treaty, countries pledged to de-mine their territory within 10 years. But 13 states, including Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Mozambique and Thailand, are not on track to meet the goal, the report said.

The United States, Russia and China, all major arms producers, are not signatories to the pact.

Article © 2006 Reuters Limited. Lesson © 2006 www.english-to-go.com

 

 


TEACHERS' NOTES AND ANSWER KEY

Pre-Reading Activities

A: How Much Do You Know? Answers
1.b.
2. Here is a definition you can use: 'A landmine is a container filled with explosive material that is placed in the ground. When a person or a vehicle passes over it, the mine explodes.' (The picture of a landmine (b.) shows a landmine that has been planted in the ground. It would then be covered over.)
3. Answers will vary.

B: Choose The Best Answer - Notes
Students can compare their answers in small groups. However, do not tell students whether their answers are right or wrong because they will be able to check their answers using today's article in Reading Activity A.

Reading Activities

A: Reading For Specific Information - Answers
1. b, 2. a, 3. b, 4. b. 5. b.

B: Thinking Carefully - Sample Answers
Landmines affect people who live near them for as long as the landmines remain planted in the ground. Children can't play there, people can't get access to water supplies, homes, schools etc cannot be built on mined ground, crops can't be planted and access to other areas is prevented. All of these affect the welfare and livelihoods of anyone living near mines and the mines could remain in the ground long after a war has finished.

More immediately, landmines continue to cause deaths and serious injury to people (including children) as long as they remain in the ground. Many people are involved in the care of the maimed and family and social relationships are devastated by the death or injury of someone from landmines.

C: Check Your Understanding - Answers
1. soldiers, children, 2. 7,328, not recorded/unrecorded, 3. 78, New York, 4. 500,000.

Note One: Useful Websites
Your students may be interested in the following websites:
http://www.icbl.org/
http://www.landmines.org.uk/
http://www.1000dinners.com/
http://www.landminesurvivors.org/
http://www.landmineaction.org
The following webpage has a useful fact sheet: http://landmines.org.uk/325

Note Two: More Lessons
Please use any other English-To-Go.com lessons about landmines. You can access them at the webpage http://www.english-to-go.com/wll
The Adopt-A-Minefield website http://www.landmines.org.uk/ has activities and reading texts suitable for elementary and highschool students and homeschoolers.

Note Three: Extra Activity
Ask students to decide whether the following ideas support the use of landmines or oppose their use.

Landmines kill and injure people, who are often civilians (not soldiers), and animals. People lose arms and legs and need long periods of medical treatment.
They are used to slow down attack from the enemy.
They ruin good farming land and make it useless for growing things for a very long time afterwards.
People making landmines make lots of money. It is a business.
Rebel soldiers may use them so government soldiers also need to use them.
Usually no records are kept of where landmines are hidden so it is very hard to remove them after a war.
Landmines stay in the ground after a war is over. They continue to kill and injure people in peace time.

Note Three: Extra Activity - Answers
Landmines kill and injure people, who are often civilians (not soldiers), and animals. People lose arms and legs and need long periods of medical treatment. (Oppose)
They are used to slow down attack from the enemy. (Support)
They ruin good farming land and make it useless for growing things for a very long time afterwards. (Oppose)
People making landmines make lots of money. It is a business. (Support)
Rebel soldiers may use them so government soldiers also need to use them. (Support)
Usually no records are kept of where landmines are hidden so it is very hard to remove them after a war. (Oppose)
Landmines remain in the ground after a war is finished. They continue to kill and injure people in peace time. (Oppose)

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© 2006 English To Go Ltd. All rights reserved. News articles © 2006 Reuters, used with permission. Illustrations © 2005 Akarana Vaega, used with permission. Adopt-A-Minefield statement © 2005 Adopt-A-Minefield, used with permission. Not to be reproduced or stored in any way without the permission of English To Go Ltd. http://www.english-to-go.com English To Go and Instant Lessons are the registered trade marks of English To Go Ltd. email: editor@english-to-go.com

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